Home > Uncategorized > The Bailout: By The Actual Numbers – ProPublica

The Bailout: By The Actual Numbers – ProPublica

September 12, 2012 Leave a comment Go to comments

Quick, how many billions in the red are taxpayers on the bailout of GM? AIG? Fannie and Freddie? Is it true that the government has reaped a profit from bailing out the banks?

It should be easy to find answers to such questions. But while it’s a snap to find rosy administration claims about the bailout, finding hard numbers is much more difficult. That’s why, since the bailouts began in 2008, we’ve maintained a frequently updated site to provide them. Now we’ve retooled our database to make it even easier to find these sorts of answers.

The Bailout Scorecard

Our frequently updated database tracks every dollar. In the scorecard, we provide a summary generated from the latest numbers.

Bailout Recipients

Our bailout recipient listtracks the companies to which Treasury has committed money.

So you can effortlessly discover that it’s $27 billion for GM, $23 billion for AIG, $91 billion for Fannie, $51 billion for Freddie, and yes, the bank investments have so far returned a profit of $19 billion.

We also make it easy for you to see which investments have resulted in losses (39 so far in total) and to sort bailout recipients by how far in the red or black they are. As always, our scorecard page adds it all up and shows where both bailouts — the Troubled Asset Relief Program, better known as TARP ($55 billion in the red) and Fannie and Freddie (negative $142 billion) — stand right now.

Ultimately, the bailout of GM seems likely to result in the TARP’s single biggest loss. But since the government still holds about a third of the company’s stock (currently worth about $10 billion), we don’t include it on our list of losers yet. It’s possible the government will sell the stock for more than it’s currently worth, recouping more of its investment.

For now, the reigning bust is the $2.3 billion investment in the bank CIT, which landed in bankruptcy less than a year after its bailout. Second on the list is Chrysler, which resulted in a $1.3 billion loss.

“The government’s financial stability programs are expected to cost far less than many had once feared during the crisis, and we’re continuing to make significant progress recovering taxpayer investments,” said a Treasury spokesman.

Over time, that list of losing investments is likely to grow far beyond 39, because many of the smaller banks that have yet to repay the government are struggling. Although more than 300 banks have exited TARP (often repaying with money from another government bank program), nearly 400 remain. Of those, 162 are behind on their dividend payments to the Treasury Department. According to the GAO, the banks that are languishing in TARP tend to be weaker than those that have left, and at least 130 appear on a secret “problem bank” list kept by regulators.

via The Bailout: By The Actual Numbers – ProPublica.

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